Keys To Fighting Plaque And Tartar Formation

Keys To Fighting Plaque And Tartar Formation

Two of the most important oral hygiene issues that need to be addressed and pain enough attention are plaque and tartar. Most dental patients usually confuse plaque and tartar and their relationship with each other. It is important to be informed and know what sets these two issues apart to be able to tailor dental hygiene and habits to aid in the prevention and control of the occurrence of these two.
Plaque. Fighting plaque is a life-long process where oral health is concerned. Plaque forms in the surface of the tooth and may collect on teeth or areas where the tooth meets the gums. It is a sticky, colorless deposit of bacteria due to the combination of saliva, food and other fluids. Plaque builds up traps stains in the teeth. These deposits may lead to the development of cavities that weaken teeth and may become a primary factor in the occurrence of gum diseases. Plaque stars to form 4 to 12 hours after brushing the teeth. This explains why it is highly recommended to brush the teeth at least twice a day. Regular tooth brushing, however, may not be enough. It is also necessary to floss daily to ensure the cleanliness of oral areas which are hard to reach through brushing.
Tartar. Another term for tartar is calculus. It is a crusty deposit that traps stain in the teeth and causes discoloration of the tooth. Calcium and phosphate are minerals that bind to form crystals in the teeth. When these minerals are hardened within a plaque, tartar is formed. Tartar is known to create strong bonds, making it removable almost only with professional help. It is important to remove tartar as soon as observed because tartar can also make removing plaque bacteria harder, creating more complicated oral problems. Pyrophosphates aid in the prevention of tartar formation. It decreases calculus build-up by inhibiting the growth of crystals on the surface of the tooth. It is important to consider the fact that plaque and tartar vary effect on different people. People may have different susceptibility depending on factors such as age. Plaque and tartar build up faster as people grow older. It is, therefore, important to watch and monitor dental/oral hygiene more closely as one grows older.
There are various ways of eliminating plaque and tartar build ups in order to prevent further damage that they can cause to one's teeth. Visit the dentist and have your teeth cleaned professionally at twice a year, or as often as the dentist recommends you to.
Choose and brush with a toothpaste that has pyrophosphates. Pyrophosphates are observed to stick to the surface of the teeth and aid in the control of crystal formation.
Another effective choice of toothpaste is one that contains hexametaphosphate. It is a form of pyrophosphate that does not only inhibit tartar formation, but also loosens the bonds formed by extrinsic stains. Choose a toothpaste with hexametaphosphate are also powerful whitening agents that serve as protective barrier to help prevent the occurrence of possible future teeth stains due to plaque and tartar.
Plaque and tartar formations can't always be helped as we indulge in food, drinks, and activities that we need and enjoy. The important thing to remember at all times is to practice proper and regular care, which includes avoiding or taking in moderation certain food and beverages that can greatly affect dental health. The dentist's words and advices are also very valuable in keeping a healthy mouth. See to it that appointments to the dentist's office are made at least once every 6 months. Sometimes, a little time and effort is all we need to be able to live a happy and healthy life.

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